span style="">header

Fiber is your friend

 

Some may feel the jury is still out on fiber's role as a cancer fighter. All the same, given the many advantages of high-fiber foods like whole grains, fruits, and veggies, the arguments for contributing more fiber to your diet are overpowering. A high-fiber diet may cut levels of blood cholesterol, help keep up regularity, and avert gastrointestinal conditions like diverticulitis.

Contrary to their processed counterparts, like white rice or white bread, whole-grain foods hold their original fiber, the nutrient-rich bran and germ, and the starchy endosperm. That may sound academic, but from a nutritional point of view it makes a huge difference.

Processing whole grains to produce a refined grain takes away most of their nutritional content. Individuals erroneously believe that the laws calling for white flour to be enriched counterbalance for the many useful nutrients lost during processing. It's straight that a few synthetic vitamins and minerals are added to our white flour, but this does not even come close to reestablishing all the lost nutrients.

 Whole wheat, for instance, contains calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, sodium, zinc, copper, manganese, and selenium. It likewise has vitamin C, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, pantothen, vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin E.

 The body changes all carbohydrates into glucose. But it breaks down processed grains much faster than intact grains. The speedy breakdown of processed carbs often causes wide sways in blood glucose that may trigger hunger cravings, cause the release of tension hormones, and originate the buildup of arterial plaques.

Basic whole grains include brown rice, barley, millet, oats, buckwheat, rye, and whole wheat. You may also want to try out some traditional Native American grains such as quinoa ("keen-wa") or amaranth, found in health-food stores. Good whole-grain recipes are simple to discover on the net. But savoring these highly nutritious foods may require patience-whole grains commonly take longer to cook than refined grains.

 

 





 

 




HOME



footer